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Mark, Episode 2: Who Jesus Loves

Last week in Mark, we read about what Jesus came to do. This week we will find out who he came for.

Crowds followed Jesus in the first chapter of Mark. The general public loved him, especially the sick and disabled. In the second chapter, the Pharisees have joined them, but not to be his disciples or seek healing. Instead they are skeptics watching Jesus carefully, waiting to either approve or reject him as a worthy teacher.

Mark 2:1-17

Jesus returns home to Capernaum. Both followers and skeptics pack his house to listen to him teach. Some guys show up with a paralyzed man. Evidently they had heard the rumors of healings and wanted to help this man back on his feet.

We don’t know how he was paralyzed or who these guys carrying him are. But we know his healing mattered so much to them that they could not wait for Jesus to come outside. They couldn’t wait for him to finish preaching. Not even for other people to make room for them. Maybe the man’s life was in danger. Whatever the situation, the men take him to the roof of the house and literally make a hole big enough to lower down the paralyzed man on a mat. Can you imagine their boldness, breaking into Jesus’ house, interrupting his lesson to a crowded room, and expecting him to heal their friend?

Their bold faith moves Jesus’ heart. So much so that he goes beyond healing the man’s physical disability. He extends spiritual healing as well. Rather than be impressed, the skeptics immediately begin doubting. They judge him as a blasphemer. But Jesus knew their thoughts, and in his response, he gives himself the title “Son of Man.” This was a prophetic name used for the Messiah, which the scribes would have recognized. He still doesn’t identify as God, but he claims authority from God. Just like in the first chapter, he uses a miracle to prove his identity. He equates the power to heal with the power to forgive.

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Credit: Kennisland (https://flic.kr/p/8PwLTK)

Jesus goes on to call a new disciple named Levi. Like the fishermen in chapter 1, Levi follows without question. In Luke 5, Levi hosts a big party in Jesus’ honor and invites his friends. These include other tax collectors and the only people who would associate with tax collectors–the unsavory types of society. So Jesus were at Levi’s party when the scribes criticize him again.

The Pharisees believed eating with the unrighteous would make themselves unrighteous, as if sin was a contagious disease. They were worried about being infected. Yes, one sinner can influence others to sin, but the Pharisees considered any association with known sinners to put themselves at risk of losing God’s approval. Jesus, on the other hand, knew eating with sinners would have the opposite effect. He had no fear of “catching” their sin, because he would actually be their cure.

Jesus refers again to the metaphor between spiritual and physical healing. A righteous person does not need saving. Since Jesus came as the Messiah, that meant he was only of use to the spiritually sick who did need saving. The Pharisees believed they were righteous, but the apostle Paul would later teach that no one is righteous and that is why all must be saved by Jesus Christ (Romans 3:10).

So when Jesus says he came not for the righteous, but for sinners, really he means he came for all people. The scribes couldn’t understand this because they thought God kept favorites. They thought he loved the good and obedient more than the rebellious. But Jesus says they’ve got God wrong. There are no scales, no weighing good deeds against the bad. God loves all people equally because they are equally sinful. He expresses his love by sending them a savior.

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Posted by on March 28, 2016 in Other thoughts

 

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